Utah Arts Festival Accessibility Guide

The annual Utah Arts Festival magically appears each summer in downtown Salt Lake City. The temporary nature of turning Washington & Library Squares and the surrounding streets into a community gathering space to celebrate the arts can provide unique challenges for those attending the Festival with special needs. We’re committed to making the Utah Arts Festival an open, accessible and safe space for its attendees.

Wheelchairs

Parking

Accessible paid parking is available at the underground lot at the City Library located at the 400 South entrance. Additional ADA designated street parking is also located on 500 South between 300 E and State Street.

Wheelchair Check-out

Action Medical provides the Festival with a number of wheelchairs for use during your visit. Available on a first come first served basis at all box office locations free of charge.

Site Accessibility

The grounds of Washington & Library Square may be challenging to get around. We have installed temporary ramps to ease access to sidewalks area streets, electrical cords are covered where possible or in place flown overhead to minimize tripping hazards.

Viewing Areas

UAF 11 ADA stage map

Patrons who use wheelchairs, scooters or other mobility devices will find designated seating or view areas at each stage/venue. Patrons who have a disability of such significance that it substantially limits their ability to stand are welcome to use these seats as well. Space is available on a first come first serve basis.

Access via wheelchairs to the Amphitheater Stage is via 400 South near 300 East (outside the Festival gates). A security guard will be posted at this location 30 minutes prior to all performances and until 30 minutes after the final act in the evening. If you need assistance with the entrance at anytime, please contact a security personnel or one of our box offices for assistance.

Accessible Toilet Facilities

Indoor restrooms are located in the lower level of the Main Library.

The Festival has portable toilet facilities located on the south side of Washington Square near the Children’s Art Yard and on the east end of the Library Square. Both are equipped with wheelchair-accessible facilities.

Pets & Service Animals

The Utah Arts Festival is not a place to bring your pet. It can be hot, crowded and loud. If your animal is lost in the crowd of 80,000 people, we don’t know if you will find it again. It is very stressful for animals and even a usually well-behaved pet may feel the need to protect its owner by attacking another person or animal.

Service Animals

Persons with disabilities and their ADA Approved Service Animals (dogs or miniature ponies) that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for those persons with disabilities are welcome at the Utah Arts Festival.

Individuals with service animals will be greeted by our security team when they enter the Festival and receive a special tag to attach to the service animal’s collar during their visit. This will let our patrons, staff and other security officials know the service animal was vetted.

If a service animal does not adhere to the following conditions staff will have the handler remove the animal from the site. The handler may return without the animal. The animal must:

  • Be housebroken
  • Be under control of and with its handler at all times
  • Not threaten the health or safety of any person or other animal

All service animals must remain with their handler at all times and must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents using these devices. In that case, the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice command.

Emotional Support Animals

The ADA does not include “emotional support animals”— animals that provide a sense of safety, companionship, and comfort to those with psychiatric or emotional conditions — in its definition of Service Animals. Although these animals often have therapeutic benefits, they are not individually trained to perform specific tasks for their handlers. Utah law specifically excludes animals who are used solely to provide emotional support, companionship, comfort, well-being, or crime deterrence.